News

  • Stanislava Pinchuk [Miso], Winner of the Glenfiddich Artist in Residence Prize

    Congratulations to Stanislava Pinchuk, winner of the Glenfiddich Artist in Residence Prize! Now in its fifteenth year, the Glenfiddich Artist in Residence Prize is valued at $21,000 and includes a three month residency in Dufftown, Scotland. During the residency artists are encouraged to examine the historic and scenic Scottish highlands and distillery. A piece will be acquired by Glenfiddich for the permanent collection as a result of the the residency.

    Read more about the residency here!

    Press:The AustralianThe AU Review

    Pinchuk_fukushima_glenfiddich

    Image: Stanislava Pinchuk, Fukushima (detail), 2016, pin-holes on paper, 75 x 101 cm

  • Sera Waters, Winner of the Heysen Prize for Landscape 2016

    Sera Waters has been announced as the WINNER of the Heysen Prize for Landscape 2016! A huge congratulations to Sera, for taking out this $15,000 acquisitive prize.

    “The Heysen Prize was established by the Hahndorf Academy in 1997 to commemorate the nationally and internationally eminent local artist, Sir Hans Heysen (1877-1968).

    Sir Hans Heysen had a deep connection with the Australian landscape and is famous for his paintings and drawings of Hahndorf in the Adelaide hills, and the Flinders Ranges. He documented village life in Hahndorf and conserved the mature gums in the surrounding area. Because of the implied realism of his pictures, many think of his art as literal depictions of the landscape that existed in front of him.”

    You can see her winning work along with the other finalists at the Hahndorf Academy until December 4th. More details here

    Sera Waters, Fritz and the rose garden, 2014, felt, hand-dyed calico and string, cotton, wool, hand-made stones, trim, approximately, 300 x 200 cm

    Image: Sera Waters, Fritz and the rose garden, 2014, felt, hand-dyed calico and string, cotton, wool, hand-made stones, trim, approximately, 300 x 200 cm

  • Dodd, Sloan and Waters in Heysen Prize

    Congratulations to James Dodd, Paul Sloan and Sera Waters who have all been selected as finalists in the Heysen Prize for Landscape 2016. Established in 1997 by the Hahndorf Academy, the Heysen Prize commemorates the life and career of renown Australian landscape painter Sir Hans Heysen.

    This acquisitive, biennial prize is worth $15,000 and will be exhibited at the Hahndorf Academy from the 8th of October till the 4th of December. The winner will be announced at the launch on Saturday the 8th of October.

    For more information, click here.

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    Image: James Dodd, Mildura Boys, 2016, acrylic on linen, 56 x 150 cm

    Paul Sloan, I'm going to tell my children's children #2, 2016, Gouache on paper, 75 x 60 cm

    Image: Paul Sloan, I’m going to tell my children’s children #2, 2016, Gouache on paper, 75 x 60 cm

    Sera Waters, Fritz and the rose garden, 2014, felt, hand-dyed calico and string, cotton, wool, hand-made stones, trim, approximately, 300 x 200 cm

    Image: Sera Waters, Fritz and the rose garden, 2014, felt, hand-dyed calico and string, cotton, wool, hand-made stones, trim, approximately, 300 x 200 cm

  • Janet Laurence in 56th October Salon and XIII Bienal de Cuenca

    Congratulations to Janet Laurence who has been selected to participate in the 56th October Salon in Belgrade, The Pleasure of Love: Transient Emotion in Contemporary Art and the XIII Bienal de Cuenca: Fragile. 

    56th October Salon, Belgrade

    The 56th October Salon in Belgrade, The Pleasure of Love: Transient Emotion in Contemporary Art will feature Janet Laurence alongside fellow Australian artist Tracy Moffatt. Curated by David Elliot, the 56th October Salon includes 60 artists both emerging and established, Laurence will be exhibiting two major works Underlying (2016) and Vanishing (2009).

    “Laurence explores what it might mean to heal, albeit metaphorically, the natural environment. Trees are the lungs of our cities – they exchange carbon dioxide and oxygen – and they usually live for several generations. Today, however, very old trees are dying in our cities, while the crops and fields in the outback have been transformed into vast barren expanses. Janet Laurence fuses this sense of communal loss with a search for connection with powerful life-forces. Her work alerts us to the subtle dependencies between water, life, culture and nature in our eco-system. In the face of this, we yearn for a form of alchemy, for the power of enchantment or transformation. It seems that the only place for that sensation is the place of art. In the tradition of Joseph Beuys, and some of the Arte Povera artists from the 1960s, such as Jannis Kounellis or Mario Merz, Janet Laurence reminds us that art can act as a kind of transformation point for ideas and it can provoke its audience into a renewed awareness about our environment.” – Victoria Lynn

    Exhibition runs from 23 September to 6 November 2016

    For more information click here.

    XIII Bienal de Cuenca

    Janet Laurence will also exhibit in the XIII Bienal de Cuenca in a parallel exhibition Fragile curated by Natalia Bradshaw. This marks the first time Australian artists have been included in the Bienal de Cuenca, Laurence will be exhibiting alongside fellow Australian artists Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Reko Rennie and Caroline Rothwell.

    “…Janet Laurence too explores impermanence, transparency and opacity Within her presentation for Cuenca. Known for her elegiac installations That address pressing environmental issues, she explores the physiology of medicinal plants from Ecuador and Their vital relationship to the human world Through This new, site-specific work. A long table supports glass vials, plastic tubing and laboratory equipment plant alongside locally sourced samples, all partially concealed (or Alternately revealed) fabric beneath a white veil. The imperiled state of the natural world, due to human intervention and catastrophe, is a recurring theme Within Laurence’s practice. All living things are Interrelated, she points out, and if we continue to treat the natural world With disregard, we will impact our own future survival as a species. Recently, Laurence has Explored the concept of the hospital as a space for the rehabilitation of plants and ecosystems under threat. The incorporation of laboratory equipment and white gauze in her works, treats including Cuenca, Suggests a space for healing and resuscitation.Through This new work, themes of interdependence and equilibrium are Brought to the fore, offering a sustainable future if we choose to acknowledge our own fragility and place Within the wider scheme of things.” – Rachel Kent, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) Sydney, Australia

    Exhibition runs from 21 October to 31 December 2016

    For more information click here.

    56th October Salon XIII Bienal de Cuenca

    Janet Laurence, Underlying, 2016, Installation, The Pleasure of Love: Transient Emotion in Contemporary Art, Belgrade

    Image: Janet Laurence, Underlying, 2016, Installation, The Pleasure of Love: Transient Emotion in Contemporary Art, Belgrade

     

  • Lisa Roet’s ‘Golden Monkey’ in Bejing

    Lisa Roet’s Golden Monkey has been installed in Bejing on The Opposite House. This large inflatable monkey measures an impressive 45 ft high and is manufactured out of gold thread.  The installation is designed to inspire thought about our connections with primates exploring similarities, acceptance and peace.

    Roet has collaborated with Inflatable Design and Felipe Reynolds and the project was supported by the City of Melbourne Arts Grants Program, The Australian Embassy, Creative Victoria, Asia Link and Australia-China Council. 

    Check out the press coverage here: Wallpaper | The Opposite House | Asia Link

    Golden Monkey in Bejing

    Image: Lisa Roet, Golden Monkey, 2016, mixed media inflatable installation on The Opposite House

  • Trent Parke at the Australian War Memorial

    Now on display at the Australian War Memorial (AWM), WW1 Avenue of Honour is a series of twenty-two images by Trent Parke. The exhibition will run until early next year and was previously exhibited as part of The First World War Now in Bruges, Belgium presented by Magnum Photos.

    Produced after a period of time spent understanding and researching the Ballarat Avenue of Honour, a site in which since 1971, 3,801 trees have been planted to honour the service of an local individual. The Avenue of Honour is the largest of it’s kind and now stretches 22kms.

    “In selecting and photographing a particular tree he sought to explore both tangible and abstract parallels between the natural forms as he encountered them and the fate of the individual whom the tree commemorates. Parke undertook detailed research drawing on the Red Cross Wounded and Missing files to find links between biographical records and the appearance of the corresponding tree in planting position, size, shape, texture, irregularities of growth, setting in the landscape or it’s silhouette against the sky. His photographs capture these visual forms as an act of contemporary commemoration. “

    For more details and information about this exhibition, visit the Australian War Memorial website here.

    Australian War Memorial

    Australian War Memorial

    Australian War Memorial

    Australian War Memorial

    Photographs by Daniel Spellman


  • William Mackinnon’s The World is as You Are at Hamilton Gallery

    William Mackinnon will present a solo exhibition, The World is as You Are, at Hamilton Gallery in Victoria.

    Hamilton Art Gallery was established in 1961 and is situated in the city-centre of Hamilton, Western Victoria. It is a perfect location for an exhibition of Mackinnon’s work, who himself grew up in regional Victoria. A connection through place is demonstrated in subject matter within the paintings, often reflecting local landmarks.

    Exhibition opens September 16 and runs until October 30.
    For more details, click here.

    William Mackinnon Hamilton Gallery

    Image: William Mackinnon, The world is as you are / Wannon Falls, 2016, acrylic, oil and automotive enamel on linen, 216 x 341 cm.

  • Hugo Michell Gallery at ‘Spring1883’

    Established in 2014, SPRING1883 is a new and exciting hotel-based art fair, presented at The Hotel Windsor Melbourne. Hugo Michell Gallery is pleased to be presenting the work of William Mackinnon, Lucas Grogan, Elvis Richardson, Toby Pola, Tarryn Gill, Richard Lewer, Will French, Tony Garifalakis amongst others for SPRING1883.

    Artists have been selected for their ability to respond to their surrounds and to complement a domestic interior. Elvis Richardson will transform the living room, revisiting her ‘Trophy’ series where she further develops her conceptual practice, studying memorialisation, lifestyle, death and taxes.

    In the adjoining bedroom, Lucas Grogan presents an intricate hand-embroidered quilt, 18 months in the making. Fabricated during his travels across Europe, Asia and the South Pacific, this quilt is a reflection on and reaction to his personal experiences and the wider human condition. Off the back of her hugely successful series exhibited during the 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art: Magic Object, Tarryn Gill presents a large-scale totem pole referencing legends, folktales and the uncanny. After his sell-out show at Hugo Michell Gallery in February, William Mackinnon will exhibit a new body of work for Spring 1883, observing themes of home, coastal Australia and journeys physical and psychological. Toby Pola’s work plays with our perception of material through a honed understanding of woodcarving. The works for SPRING1883 reflect Pola’s sense of irony and highlight the site-specific nature of the exhibition.

    Also featuring: Justine Varga, Stanislava Pinchuk [Miso], Narelle Autio, Nana Ohnesorge, Dan McLean/Paul Sloan, David Booth [Ghostpatrol], Amy Joy Watson and Sera Waters

    Visit us in Room 124 from Thursday 18 – Sunday 21 August.

    See SPRING1883 website for full details.

    spring1883

    Image:

    William Mackinnon, Cactus (Ibiza), 2016, oil, acrylic and enamel on canvas, 120 x 150 cm

    Lucas Grogan, The Shroud, 2016, cotton on Italian wool, Chux, Venetian lace, cotton and upholstery fabric, 244 x 230 cm

    Tarryn Gill, Light & Shadow Sphinx, 2015-2016, mixed media (inc. foam, hand stitched fabrics, LEDs, beads, synthetic hair), 74 x 32 x 54 cm each

  • Richard Lewer in ‘Close to home: Dobell Australian Drawing Biennial 2016’

    Richard Lewer is exhibiting in Close to home: Dobell Australian Drawing Biennial 2016 at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, alongside Jumaadi, Maria Kontis, Noel McKenna, Catherine O’Donnell, and Nyapanyapa Yunupingu. The artists have been selected as they share similarities within presenting themes of narrative, memory, and experience through drawing.

    “Melancholy is the theme of eight portraits and a self-portrait by Richard Lewer, that form a gallery of friends who have suffered from “mental illness”, which almost certainly means ‘depression’. Each figure is captured in a frontal format that resembles a mug shot or a passport photo. A few manage a smile, or the hint of a smile. The tone of each picture is appropriately grey, but viewers will be seduced by the dexterity of Lewer’s pencil work.”

    Exhibition runs July 20 to December 11. For more details head here.

    Dobell Australian Drawing Biennial 2016 by John McDonald.

    Dobell Australian drawing biennial

  • Janet Laurence at Australian Museum

    Janet Laurence will be exhibiting at the Australian Museum opening Thursday 28th of July. The installation Deep Breathing (Resuscitation for the Reef) has returned from the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle in Paris as Laurence participated in the Paris Climate Change Convention. Focusing on coral bleaching, Janet’s multi-disciplinary practice creates metaphoric propositions that are based on known science and her own experience of threatened natural environments.

    Visit the Australian Museum website for full details.

    Janet Laurence, 'Deep Breathing (Resuscitation for the Reef)', 2015

    Image: Janet Laurence, ‘Deep Breathing (Resuscitation for the Reef)’, 2015, mixed media installation, for UNFCCC/COP21 at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris

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